Category Archives: Irvine

Important SAT Essay Tip From an Irvine SAT Tutor

SAT Essay Tip: The Passage is Trying to Trick You!

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While the essay portion of the SAT is now optional, it can still be a valuable component of your college application – particularly if you’re trying to emphasize your writing or English skills (book your private Irvine SAT tutor today). The directions for the essay are the same for each test:

” As you read the passage below, consider how [Author] uses:
-evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims.
-reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence.
-stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion,
to add power to the ideas expressed. ”

They will then ask you to choose one or more of these elements and write about how the author uses them and why (focusing on the most relevant features in the prompt). These instructions do not change, so they should be memorized beforehand in order to save time reading during the test. However, the passage itself will be different every time.

Remember that these passages are meant to be persuasive. You will be reading some author’s argument where they are using various methods to try to convince you that their opinion is correct. They also tend to be rather strong and compelling arguments – they are hand-picked for the SAT after all.

These passages lead to a common issue that I see students have: they are persuaded by the author and agree with him/her by the time they’re done reading.

Now, agreeing with the passage does not have to be a bad thing, but it does tend to lead to two problems when it comes to writing your essay:

– You include your approval in your essay
– You don’t notice the persuasive elements being used
– Of these two, the first is common but easy to deal with. The directions for the SAT specifically say that you should NOT say whether or not you agree with the author’s claims. – Many students get motivated and enthusiastic about the cause that the author is championing after they read the passage, and they write about how the author is correct and even bring in extra outside support. This is NOT what you are supposed to do. Likewise if you disagree with the author. You are only supposed to discuss which of the above examples of persuasive elements you see in the passage and how/why they are used.

The second is the more difficult to get past. When you disagree with someone’s argument, you are more likely to be on high alert for any flaws in their arguments or tricks they are trying to utilize. This is more difficult if you agree with them and are simply nodding along in support. It’s easy to be less critical when you agree with someone. So here is the tip to help you notice more persuasive elements in the prompt: Pretend that the author is trying to trick you.

Go into reading the prompt thinking that the author is wrong but that they are trying to trick you to make you believe them. Even if the passage is called “Why People Like Puppies,” you need to be thinking to yourself “I know that people don’t like puppies and this guy is trying to trick me that they do.” It does not matter what you actually think. It does not matter if the author is right or wrong. What matters is that you find evidence, reasoning, and persuasive elements that the author is using in their argument. And it is easier to find the persuasive elements when you have the mindset that they are out to trick you.

Continuing with our puppy example, here are some things you could see:

Author: “Suzy, a suburban mother of three, tells us how her pottery club includes two members who brought their puppies to a meeting one day and everyone unanimously enjoyed their company.”

You: “Suzy and her pottery club are only a small group and specific demographic. The author is just using a happy anecdote to make me believe them.”

Author: “Puppies are the quintessential eliminators of stress on college campuses during finals weeks. Everyone knows that finals are a difficult time, why wouldn’t we support something that helps ease that stress?”
You: “That’s a gross hyperbole that they’re using to convince me. They’re also using a rhetorical question that I know has nothing to do with puppies, AND they’re trying to relate to me by mentioning finals that might appeal to students. I’m onto them.”

Now, these are more lighthearted examples than you may see on the real test, but they get the point across. It would be easy to read these statements by the author, and just think “yes, people do like puppies, this is correct, I agree.” However, you need to look at things with a critical eye. The author is trying to persuade you, to convince you, to trick you – and you need to see how and why in order to ace your essay.

Are you taking the SAT soon? Sign up for a private Irvine SAT tutor today.

Michael C. is currently a private math, science, and standardized test tutor with TutorNerds in Irvine and Anaheim.

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.

Three More Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Irvine Tutor

Get the Most Out of Your Private Orange County Tutor: 3 More Tips

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We discussed here three pieces of advice to help you have successful lessons with your new tutor. In short, the tips were to send them your material ahead of time, have specific goals in mind that you want them to help you reach, and to show them your previous graded assignments to review. These are beneficial actions that can best allow your tutor to evaluate your situation beforehand and help you work toward your goals in the sessions – book your private Irvine tutor today.

Now we’ll talk about advice for a tutoring session itself. Here are three things that you should and shouldn’t be doing if you want to get the most out of your lesson.

Do Assignments Early

One often under-appreciated benefit of having tutoring appointments is that it makes you accountable to someone else to finish your work on time. This benefit can be amplified if you strive to do your work before your tutoring session. This way, you will already know what parts confuse you and what parts you want to focus on before your tutor arrives. This can save time and energy and also reduce the stress caused by procrastinating. Get your assignments done early and use your tutoring appointments as a deadline to make yourself finish work ahead of time – you’ll be grateful you did it later.

Be Working and Ready

Unless your tutor is bringing you the material you need to study, you should already be working before your tutor arrives. Have your paper/notes/laptop/practice test or whatever necessary materials out and ready. A lot of time is wasted in tutoring sessions by dawdling and getting prepared in the beginning. Get yourself in a studying mindset ahead of time and have your materials ready. This also shows that you are professional and eager to improve – good traits to practice displaying for the future.

Don’t Focus on Complaints

One of the most common conversations a tutor has with a new student is the talk about how the student dislikes their class and/or teacher: the teacher is mean or isn’t fair, the class is too hard or confusing, other teachers give an easier class, your assignment was graded harshly, the teacher doesn’t know how to teach, etc. While many of these problems can be valid – there are many terrible teaches and unfair classes out there – they shouldn’t be a focal point of your Irvine tutoring. If your goal is to improve your grade in a class, then you should be focused on what steps you need to do to accomplish that. You likely aren’t going to change your teacher; you can only change your approach to studying and working. It’s okay to explain the situation and vent to your tutor every once in a while, but don’t become one of the students who only want to complain and gossip instead of working to improve.

Remember: it’s you and your Irvine tutor working together to help you reach your goals. If you set yourself up for success with your tutor, then you will be able to achieve it.

Michael C. is currently a private math, science, and standardized test tutor with TutorNerds in Irvine and Anaheim.

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.

Irvine PSAT Tutoring: Don’t Stress About the PSAT

Tips from an Irvine PSAT Tutor: Don’t Stress About the PSAT

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If you are considering taking (or have already taken) the PSAT, you might be wondering how important the test and your scores on it are. PSAT stands simply for “Preliminary SAT,” so its predominant purpose is to be an introduction to the standardized testing style of the SAT. The PSAT is a full-length, proctored, standardized test administered by College Board (the same group that makes the SAT). As such, it’s a good early simulation of the conditions and pacing that you can expect on the SAT – book your private Orange County PSAT tutor today.

That being said, I will take a somewhat controversial opinion in stating that the PSAT is not very important or significant for students. You should not worry and stress about getting a good PSAT score or not. You don’t need to study specifically for the PSAT. You also do not have to seek out and pay to take the PSAT if your school is not giving it to you for free (or requiring it). Here’s why:

1. PSAT Scores Do Not Improve SAT Scores

It is relatively well-known that students who take the PSAT tend to have improved scores on the regular SAT when compared to students who never took the PSAT. This is one reason why many schools offer the PSAT for free or require it to be taken – they believe it will boost their students’ eventual SAT numbers a year or two later.

However, the exact same effect is seen when taking any official SAT practice test: the first test you get a lower score, then the next test (even if it’s taken only a few days later) your score “magically” jumps up by 100 points or more. This is simply because students are not used to this type of test until they try it. In the first practice test they learn about the question types, they read the instructions, they get an idea of how fast they need to go, etc.

If you have never taken a practice test, then the PSAT will have this same effect for you. However, a practice test is just fine, and arguably better since you will have the test to go over and review what you got wrong. There’s nothing intrinsically special about the PSAT test itself that brings your scores up. It’s just practice.

2. The National Merit Scholarships Aren’t as Common as You Think

A very common reason given for taking the PSAT is the opportunity to win a national merit scholarship for your score. These scholarships are given to students who score particularly well on the test, and it is a reason that many people give for taking the test.

While I do agree that every opportunity to earn potential scholarship money is valuable, the National Merit Scholarships tend to be blown out of proportion for how available they are. Using the official 2017-2018 annual report, we can find that 1.6 million students took “eligible” PSAT exams that year. Of those students, about 2% got a nice “good job” certificate for their high scores. No scholarships for them. Only 0.5% of students earned a scholarship for their score.

Many blogs say you need to take the PSAT to potentially be a merit scholar, but students should recognize that only about 1 in 200 test takers earn one.

3. The PSAT Is Not the Best Practice

The PSAT is objectively easier than the SAT. It is also shorter but gives you more time per question for some questions. It also does not have an essay.

These differences are not huge, but they are significant. If you are preparing for the SAT for college applications, you want your practice to mimic the real thing as closely as possible. Easier tests might leave you over-confident before the real test. Taking shorter practice tests might not prepare you as well for the length of the actual SAT. This becomes significant if you are planning to do the essay, which the PSAT will not prepare you for. Similarly, the no-calculator section on the PSAT might mess with your pacing since you get nearly 20% more time on PSAT no-calculator math questions.

The purpose of this message is not to convince you to not take the PSAT, or to not take it seriously when you take it. On the contrary, I recommend taking it to all of my students. It’s cheap ($17 – though some schools make it free and others add on a little more in an admin fee), you might win a scholarship, and it gives you proctored, standardized test experience in a testing environment. Ideally, I think students should take a practice PSAT, then the real PSAT starting in 8th or 9th grade. In 10th grade, you can take the PSAT as well (or again), but you should also be incorporating official SAT practice tests in your studying.

The reason for this blog is to reduce the stress associated with the test. If your school doesn’t administer it, don’t worry. You are allowed to take it at a neighboring local school that does offer it, or you can just skip it. You don’t need it to improve your SAT score. You probably won’t be missing out on a merit scholarship. It is not the best way to practice. And if you aren’t happy with your PSAT score, again – don’t worry. You can still do very well on the SAT if you start early, use the best, official preparation material and practice tests, and consider looking into an experienced Irvine SAT tutor to guide the way.

Michael C. is currently a private math, science, and standardized test tutor with TutorNerds in Irvine and Anaheim.

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.

Irvine Math Tutoring: The Unit Circle

Irvine Math Tutoring Tips: The Unit Circle – Learning and Memorizing Made Easy!

The Unit Circle is a staple of trigonometry and precalculus classes. It is a circle with a radius of one that is centered at the origin of a two-dimensional coordinate system. Essentially the simplest circle that we can put on our grid – book your private Irvine math tutor today.

Nearly every class will require students to memorize specific angles and they’re coordinates on this circle. For example, the “top” of the circle is at 90° (the angle is measured from the right side of the x-axis, or the “East” stem if you think of it as a compass) which is the point (0 , 1) since it is straight up and the unit circle has a radius of one. Similarly, we get (0, -1) at 270° at the bottom of the circle. The harder memorization comes in when you look at some of the points that are don’t lie perfectly on our axes. See an image of a typical unit circle below.

the-unit-circle

image taken from Wikipedia, submitted by Jim.belk

Here, we see the points we mentioned, but also a lot of pi symbols, radicals, and many fractions. This image can look quite daunting since most teachers expect you to be able to draw it yourself on command. So, let’s dissect how to learn it more easily with much less memorization.

First, we need to know how to use radians (a way to measure angles without degrees). We won’t get into why radians are the way they are in this post, but you understand them on the unit circle. You’ll need to know two facts:

A circle is 360°

A circle is 2π radians

With these two facts, we can convert between the two with some dimensional analysis. It’s like how knowing that 12 inches is 1 foot allows you to figure out that 4 feet is 48 inches. For some examples, here is how to find 30° in radians:

Here we set up the fractions since we know that 2π is the same as 360°. You cross multiply and divide to find x, simplifying the fraction at the end. Here is the same concept except converting from radians to degrees. Let’s say we have π/4 and want to find it in degrees:

Here we had some more fractions to work with, but the pis cancel out to give us 45°.

Now back to the unit circle. The unit circle is better memorized as two circles instead of one. On one circle they count by 30° increments (which we just learned is equal to π/6 radians) and on the other, we count by 45° increments (which we also just learned is equal to π/4 radians). Here is circle number one:

unit-circle

Notice the bold terms.  They all have a denominator of 6.  This circle corresponds to the blue lines we see on Wikipedia circle.  But notice how much easier it is to memorize in increments of π/6.  One π/6, Two π/6, Three π/6, Four π/6, etc. up until all the way around the circle is Twelve π/6.  The unit circle is just simplifying the fractions!  12 π/6 is just 2π since 12/6 = 2.  Just count the π/6’s around the circle and simplify the fractions.  Much simpler than memorizing all of those fractions.

Now that we know the angles of the unit circle, we have to learn the coordinates at each angle.  The ones on the corners aren’t bad since those are just variations of -1, 0, and 1 and we can tell what the coordinate pair should be.  For the remaining 8 points, here are the only two numbers we need to memorize:

Again, we won’t go into why these are the numbers since we’re just focused on memorization. Notice here that they both have a denominator of 2. Then, notice that √3 is larger than 1. Every coordinate point will be a combination of these points, so just look for which side is bigger. If the x side looks bigger (like in π/6), then the x side gets the √3/2 and the y side gets the 1/2. For 10π/6, notice that the longer side is in the y-direction and is going down. This means the y coordinate get the √3/2 and it is negative: (1/2, -√3/2).

Notice now that the bold terms are all with a denominator of 4. Here we count by π/4’s instead of π/6’s. This circle corresponds to the red lines on the regular unit circle. Here we count increments of π/4 until we get to 8π/4 which is our full circle of two pi. Memorize that these are the two circles that are put on top of each other for the full unit circle. Both are just counting until you get to 2π.

Now we’ll learn the coordinate points for this circle. The “corners are still the same as the blue circle ((1,0), (0,1), (-1,0), and (0,-1)), and we only have one number to memorize for the diagonal angles in between:

All of the coordinates for these angles on the unit circle will be √2/2 for both x and y. Just don’t forget to include the negative signs when necessary. So, for example, 3π/4 will be (-√2/2, √2/2) and 5π/4 will be (-√2/2, -√2/2).

If you can keep these two circles separate in your head it will significantly help you when drawing your own: and without the brute force memorization of every reduced fraction that many teachers suggest. Notice too that the diagonals of the orange circle fit perfectly between the diagonals of the blue circle since 45° is halfway between 30° and 60°.

Though memorization is still necessary, hopefully this guide will save you from mindlessly cramming and consequently forgetting your unit circle as you delve deeper into trigonometry.

From trigonometry to statistics, our private Irvine math tutors are here to help. Call TutorNerds today to book you Irvine math tutor.

Michael C. is currently a private math, science, and standardized test tutor with TutorNerds in Irvine and Anaheim.

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.

Irvine Tutoring: Four Things Students Should do Post Winter Break

Four Things Students Should Do After Winter Break

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The holidays are over, it’s a New Year, and students are ready to go back to school. Okay, maybe you’re not prepared to go back, but you have to regardless of how you feel. With a New Year comes new aspirations, goals, and resolutions. Whether you’re doing well and want to keep it up, or you think there’s room for improvement in the second half of the school year, these tips will help you get on track – book your private Orange County tutor today.

Just like the first half of the year, winter and spring will fly by, so get ahead by taking actions now that will benefit you when finals come around. Like a car driving in the snow, back to school in January can start slow then get out of control in an instance. Do yourself a favor and get ahead before homework and tests start picking up in pace. Below are four tips from our private Irvine tutors to help you make 2019 your most successful year yet.

1. Take Stock of Where You Are at

While most of us want to leave 2018 in the past, students will benefit from a review of the previous semester. Check your grades, test scores, homework, and written assignments from the Fall semester. Do you feel like you are behind, doing well, or somewhere in between? What did you struggle with the most and at what did you most excel? By answering these questions, you can look ahead to your 2019 schedule and help plan around your assessment. For example, if you struggled with writing essays, but breezed through your book assignments, plan your study/homework time accordingly. Start the assignments you struggle with the earliest. That way you have time to seek help if you need some, which brings us to our next suggestion.

2. Book a Private Orange County Tutor

Once you’ve reviewed the first half of the school year, it’s time to get help where you need it most. Whether you book a private Orange County in-person tutor from TutorNerds or an online tutor from TutorNerd, it’s always best to sign up early. The longer you wait to start tutoring, the farther behind you fall in your classes. Keep in mind that even if you are doing well in school, you can still benefit from the help of a private OC tutor.

3. Talk to Your Teachers

If you have the opportunity, book some time to talk to your teachers during office hours or before or after class. Ask them how they think you are performing and if they have any suggestions on how you can improve. Your teachers would much rather steer you in the right direction early on than have you begging for extra credit after you bomb your test (READ: Irvine Tutoring Tips: How to Overcome a Bad Teacher).

4. Set up a Schedule with a Study Buddy or Group

A new semester means a fresh start. Avoid falling behind with a designated study routine. While you’ll always have to do some studying on your own, keep it interesting with one-on-one sessions with a study buddy or a weekly group study session. By studying in a group, you’ll be able to get help in areas other students thrive in as well as help them out with their work. Having a designated study session will help with procrastination as well as remind you of important upcoming assignment dates.

Here are TutorNerds, we are happy to help you make 2019 the year of academic success. Call us today to book your private Orange County tutor.

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.

Irvine Calculus Tutor Tips: Why is Calculus Such a Stumbling Block?

Tips From an Irvine Calculus Tutor: The Calculus Conundrum: Why is Calculus Such a Stumbling Block?

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Many students dread taking calculus. Whether it’s the final math class of high school or a required prerequisite for their college degree, calculus is often a necessary mathematical capstone in education. Calculus also tends to carry with it a reputation for being much more difficult than previous math – book your private Irvine calculus tutor today. This stereotype is supported by many students who struggle and even fail their first calculus class. Often times, these are students who completed – or even excelled in – their previous math classes. So why is calculus such a stumbling block? What makes it so different from our other math courses?

The first, likely the most significant, reason for calculus difficulties is the class’s deviation from the previous progression in math classes. Coming into calculus, students have been following progressions in their math knowledge for years. First, we learn addition, and that 2 + 3 is equal to 5. Then we learn how addition leads to multiplication, or that 2 x 3 = 2 + 2 + 2 = 6. Finally, we learn how multiplication leads to exponents, or that 23 = 2 x 2 x 2 = 8. This process took years of math classes to master and build up from addition. A similar process happens with subtraction to division to negative exponents; in algebra with one variable to single step equations to multi-step to multi-variable; and in functions from linear to quadratic, to polynomial and their graphs. These progressions build upon themselves and have students master the previous concepts before moving on to the next, usually over the course of years. You may have learned addition in the 1st grade but didn’t see an exponential until 7th. You probably did your first “find x” in middle school, but weren’t conquering complex polynomial factoring until 10th or 11th grade.

Calculus throws this timeline of progression out the window. Now you’re starting over with new concepts and new progressions, but it’s consolidated to just one class.

When you learned linear functions in middle school they teach you how to find the slope, but do they ever mention the word derivative? When you move on to quadratics, do you also learn the graph of the slope of your parabola? As your graphs approach asymptotes, was there ever a mention of limits? When you had to memorize dozens of transformations and identities in trigonometry, were any of them the derivatives or integrals of the functions?

You’ve been working with calculus concepts for years without knowing because the teachers are saving it all for calc class. And once you get to calculus, they spring it all on you and expect you to jump through all of the hurdles in a few weeks. Remember that nice progression from addition to exponents that gave your years to master the topics and become an expert? Now you have a month if you’re lucky to get from the derivative of y = 2x to deriving y = (sin(3×2 -4))3(ex+1)-5. If your teacher lost you somewhere along the way, you’re doomed for the rest of the year. Just like you would be doomed in middle school if you never mastered addition.

The same fast-track progressions happen with integrals, with limits, and with sequences and series. You’ll see symbols you’ve never seen before, doing operations that are entirely unfamiliar, and you’re expected to progress from beginner to expert in them all. And you better not try to simply memorize some equations and problem-solving steps, or the word problems will eat you alive (READ: 5 Signs You Need a Math Tutor in College).

This last idea is a common problem even for students who get an ‘A’ grade in their calculus class. Many students have the memorization capacity and studying habits to learn how to do calculus problems. They learn how to solve their integrals and manipulate their functions by sheer repetition without always understanding what’s going on. This leads to another quintessential calculus complaint: “When would I ever use this is real life?” Students have a hard time seeing any applications when all they have to rely on memorization and don’t understand what they’re doing.

Stay tuned for part two! In the meantime, book your private Irvine calculus tutor from TutorNerds. Call us for more information.

Michael C. is currently a private math, science, and standardized test tutor with TutorNerds in Irvine and Anaheim.

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.

Why You Should Choose TutorNerds For Your Irvine Tutoring

Why You Should Choose TutorNerds For Your Irvine Tutoring

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As students get back in the swing of things at school, it’s time to consider hiring a private tutor. Too many students wait until their first report card or failed test to get help, but we recommend starting early with your tutoring. Tutors help boost confidence and improve study habits, two crucial factors in having a successful school year. So why choose TutorNerds? There are a lot of national tutoring chains, but none of them provide the level of quality and consistency that we do. TutorNerds is a company founded and operated right here in Southern California. In other words, we care about how our students do because we care about our community.

We also offer affordable packages and group rates for those looking for long-term tutoring! Wait, it gets even better. You and a friend can score a FREE tutoring session with our referral program. Check out our comic to learn how the program works.

There are many reasons to choose TutorNerds for your Irvine tutoring needs, here are four.

Experience

Our private Orange County tutors have experience. Further, our tutors have graduated from universities such as MIT, UCSD, USC, Columbia, Chicago University, and many other prestigious establishments. We only hire experienced and highly educated tutors, which means you’re getting help from someone who is an expert in the subject on which you are working to improve.

Local

We are proud to be a Southern California company. Further, we care about our community and work hard to make sure Orange County is always improving in academics and testing.

Customize Based on Your Needs

We approach tutoring a little differently than the corporate tutoring chains. Our services are customized based on your needs. For example, we start your program with a few questions to help us match you with the perfect Orange County tutor. After that, we work around your schedule and make sure our tutors can meet you in a place and at a time that is convenient. From there, our tutors will come up with a practical plan for moving forward based on your needs and learning habits.

Results

Our tutors’ main focus is on getting you results. From improved test scores to A’s on your next report card, we will work hard to make sure your efforts pay off. TutorNerds tutors have proven track records including a 97% success rate when it comes to college admissions consulting.

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

If you aren’t happy with your private Orange County tutoring, you don’t pay. We make this promise because we are confident in our tutors and their ability to improve your grades and test scores. If you are not happy with your tutoring, then we will refund your unused sessions. To show how confident we are in our process, we don’t require any contracts to be signed.

Make the right choice this school year and go with a local tutoring company that employs the best tutors in Irvine and the rest of Southern California. We can’t wait to help you meet your academic goals!

tutor logo Ask A Nerd! SAT Subject Tests All blog entries, with the exception of guest bloggers, are written by Tutor Nerds. Are you an education professional? If so, email us at pr@tutornerds.com for guest blogging and collaborations. We want to make this the best free education resource in SoCal, so feel free to suggest what you would like to see us write.